Catamenial Seizures
A Form of
Premenstrual
Syndrome
An Inquiry into the
Safest & Most
Practical
Management

Seizures specifically tied to
your menstrual cycle mid
cycle ovulation days, the days
right before menstrual flow, or
during flow days? Do you
have seizures from mid-cycle
right through to flow? Or has
seizure activity increased or
changed in your late 30s
and 40s? You might have a
form of premenstrual
syndrome (PMS) called
catamenial seizures. New
brain research, in this leading-
edge report, offers several
safe new remedies.

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What to do About
Losing Your Hair

Ten action steps to put in
motion and save your hair.
Current research
accompanies each action.
Restore the quality and
quantity of your scalp hair
with the latest knowledge
from bio-medical science.

View Table of Contents

Fatness in Women:
How to get Control
& Eliminate this
Phenomenon

Adiposity (fatness) is a
species-wide adaptation
which evolved to buffer
possible food scarcity in the
pregnant mammalian female.
It is a phenomenon not a
dysfunction/disease.

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Polycystic Ovary
Syndrome - 
Dysfunction or
Naturally Ocurring
Phenomenon

Reach your goals of
menstrual cycles, pregnancy,
weight loss, optimism and
health with this science
packed 31 page report.

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Severe
Premenstrual
Syndrome (PMS):
New Scientific
Evidence Points to a
Neuro-receptor Malfunction as the
Cause

If you have life-altering PMS
or postpartum depression,
don't waste time with psycho-
therapy. Or have your health
jeopardized with un-
necessary surgeries. Get this
report and the newest facts
straight from the world's
foremost researchers.

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Women and
Depression: What
Molecular Biology
is Discovering
about the Female
Brain that Improves
Treatment

Get this up-to-date report on
the triad of premenstrual
syndrome, postpartum
depression and difficult
perimenopausal transition.
Waiting for the newest
information to filter down to
your doctor can take time you
probably don't have.

View Table of Contents

Women and Depression
What Molecular Biology is Discovering about the
Female Brain that Improves Treatment

Author:                     Heather Ewart  
Email:     heather@femalebrain.com  

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)
Page 1 of 55

Q. 

I am 44, approx 40-50 lbs overweight, low sex drive, unmotivated. With recent reading starting to wonder if it's hormonal. I still have regular (normal) periods. Breast tenderness and water retention BRUTAL from onset of ovulation to start of period. Depression mild but consistent. I am diabetic type II (from being fat) and have heart disease. Hormones? Safe/Unsafe? Suggestions? Ideas? thx.

 

A. 

Everything that you are experiencing is phenomena of a very difficult peri-menopausal transition (from fertile to sterile) that about 20% of women experience.

This cohort of women, unless extremely knowledgeable, is very poorly medically managed when presenting in doctors' offices desparate for help.

While excellent treatment and management information exists in the research literature - www.pubmed.gov - doctors are not taught it in medical school and don't take the time to look-up the information in practice.

For a more extensive answer please pose your question through femalebrain's GET ANSWERS $2.95 pay-per-question-service.

To find out what research information doctors(should)use to manage your difficult transition sugggest you purchase and download femalebrain's 'Women and Depression: What Molecular Biology is Discovering about the Female Brain that Improves Treatment' and 'Fatness in Women: How to get Control & Eliminate this Phenomenon' - both immediately available from the left hand margin of this page.




Q. 

Why are women more emotional than men? Are they mentally weaker?

 

A. 

It is true that women have twice the life-time episodes of anxiety and depression. However, for the last one hundred years in the US, men have committed suicide at four times the rate of women. So, if you use suicide as a measure of mental health, women are in much better shape than men.




Q. 

It is Sunday January 7. I got up this morning feeling extremely depressed. My son and daughter both play on rep teams. One hockey the other soccer. I've got to take my daughter to a soccer game today but all I want to do is sit in my bedroom and read a big novel. When the guys come home all they will do is sit in front of the TV and watch football. If the house gets cleaned it'll be me doing it. They will fall over a bag of garbage before they will pick it up. If I complain I get these great arguments that they do the outside work and I do the inside and they work just as hard as I do. If I hear that one more time I'm going to drive a rock through the window. Since I turned 40 it seem that this depression and anger is getting worse. I need some strategies. ...Stephanie

 

A. 

Decide, by keeping a calendar of menstrual events, if your inertia and depression occur at the same specific time of the month, each month.

Read throught the NEWS items and Q&As at this website and pose the following question to yourself "Do I belong to the neuro-hormonal cohort of women who have the linked phenomenon of pms, post-partum depression and difficult long perimenopausal transition?"

If your answer to the above query is yes, suggest that you team the rest of your reproductive life with the emerging science knowledge on these neuro-hormonal syndromes. Your doctor is not aware of the science and wasn't taught it in medical school. So either go to www.pubmed.gov, the information that doctors (should) use, and research or download the e-documents for sale here at femalebrain.com.

The quality of the rest of your life depends on you becoming extensively informed and knowledgeable regarding the neural effect of reproductive hormones which are as psycho-active as drugs.




Q. 

Heather, I'm 45 years old. I've had regular cycles since I was 13. Every few months they have been really bad. When I go to the doctor I'm always prescribed Prosac or some other drug. They help alleviate the depression but I feel like I'm going in slow motion. I still get these times of rage when I could throw a hammer thru the window. I've sat down and read fiction to escape this horror but I'm sick and tired of it. Nothing changes. None of these quick fixes that are advertised seem to help. When I get into these real moody days, my husband quietly disappears.
I'm 180 pounds and fed up with suffering quietly on my own. Where do I start? What should I be reading? Is there anybody out there that cares? My Doctor seems to just want the scripting fee! I don't think he really knows what to do? Can you help me?.... Fed up.

 

A. 

Dear Fed up,

Knowledge is the BIG KEY to managing your well-being if you belong to that population of women who experience the following;

Transient but monthly negative emotional behaviors, directly caused by their own reproductive hormones. This phenomenon is termed in the medical literature as Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS).

It may be that a tremendous number of women suffer from varing degrees of PMS. However there is no medical diagnostic test for PMS. And therefore no way to know the epidemiology or prevelance of PMS.

The only way to self-diagnose PMS is to personally keep a calendar of menstrual cycle events for three months, using 100% accurate ovulation kits to find ovulation day. Negative emotional behavior and a host of other quality-of-life disrupting symptoms are confined to the post ovulatory section of the menstrual cycle and clear with/during menstruation. [50% of the time the calendars, at the end of three months, do not reflect PMS]

Disinterest, low priority, and outright negligence generally characterizes the medical management of female-specific phenomena, and PMS is no exception. The solution is to NOT rely on the treating doctor to be knowledgeable about PMS, go to the medical science literature yourself and get the facts.

As indicated on Femalebrain's home page there is a huge disconnect between what is in the medical science research literature and what your doctor is aware of. This disconnect is especially true of PMS. The mounting evidence points to a neuro-receptor malfunction where progesterone is prevented from having an inhibitory (as opposed to excitatory) effect on emotional behavior.

If you can't go to the science literature yourself - pubmed - I have gone for you. The articles - left side of this page - can be downloaded for a truely nominal fee given your quality of life is at stake.

And please, if you have female children note from the NEWS page (August 1, 2006 Important PMS Discovery) that Harvard's 30 year ongoing cohort study of 100,000 nurses has indicated that 1200 mgs of calcium from dairy products (4 cups of low fat milk per day) may prevent PMS -thought to be heritable - from developing.




Q. 

I am 51 years old, haven't had a period in a year. Depressed, crying over everything, hating my husband, hate sex. Think I am going mentally crazy. Doctor put me on Activella. Been on it for the past two months. Hot flashes gone, but still depressed. Any suggestions?

 

A. 

Please read the femalebrain.com NEWS item for Aug 12/06 titled Working out Your Anxiety.

Suggest you start a walking program today, go at any speed you can manage and keep working at it until you build-up over one year, to 4 miles per day, 5-6 times per week.

Keep a diary of your emotions and you will start to see a very slight improvement each week with a large culmuative effect at the end of each month that you keep working at your program.

In two weeks or so when the exercise program starts to kick-in please try our GET ANSWERS SERVICE. There are some questions you should pose to your MD about the wisdom of taking synthetic hormones - Activella.




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